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chipper

Raw food diet

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Good morning all

I have an 11 week old Lurcher pup and am slowly introducing her to a raw food diet, i try to vary her diet as much as possible so over a typical week I feed her 3 main meals a day plus either chicken wings/chicken necks.

Would the following provide her with all the necessary  dietary  requirements?.

A raw chicken wing or chicken neck around 6am 

Then either minced lamb/beef/chicken with a little ox heart/ox liver around 9am then the same at 1pm and then again at 5pm

Then around 9pm another chicken wing/chicken neck

A couple of times a week i will add some mackerel/pilchards in either tomato sauce or sunflower oil, a raw egg and some full fat goats milk, She also has meaty raw lamb rib bones two or three times a week.

Occasionally she will also have scrambled egg made with goats milk

I have heard that certain vegetables are also very good so would like to add some but am unsure as to which veg to add, also should the veg be fed raw or cooked and should it be grated/blended before adding to the raw meat.

Is there any thing else I should be adding???.

Any advice is very much appreciated.

kind regards 

Chipper

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Posted (edited)

@excuseme is our raw food guru and will likely be along shortly to advise. I don't think veg are necessary although with a descenancy from scavengers dogs have always had some in their diet and many enjoy them. A raw carrot makes a good alternative to a chew, and if you freeze it it is soothing for teething puppies. Some cooked pumpkin or squash (available in tins - NOT the pie mix; or frozen in supermarkets) is handy to have as a little amount firms up loose poo, and a more generous amount helps shift constipation. Never give grapes or raisins, or avocado.

Edited by JoanneF

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Thankyou Joanne

I'm sure i have also read somewhere that onions or anything from the onion family ( leeks etc) can be potentially fatal to dogs, is that right ?.

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You are right not to feed onions; a small amount of garlic is believed to be ok. However I'm not sure how much is too much!

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Whoops, i forgot to say that I add a little green minced tripe a couple of times a week ( is it really supposed to smell like that lol)

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Hello,

What a lucky puppy having a new owner who wants to feed raw !

Your variety sounds quiet ok, you have obviously done some homework before starting.

There is no benefit in giving a puppy of your age any milk, so I would quiet happily stop this.

My lot get onions if we have any left over stew (I always use a lot in our own food) and if some pieces of raw were to drop onto the floor while preparing them I would not worry if one of the girls were to quickly grab it and swallow it!  But I would not intentionally add any to the girls diets on a regular basis.

You are giving quiet a lot of bones, they are a good product and there is plenty of good nutrition in edible bones. If you find that your pup's poo's are getting very white and hard on a regular basis it may be better to give a little less bone and offer more meat. I am sure with the lovely variety you are using everything will be fine.

Some say that fruit and vegetables are not required, but if you watch wild dogs or even our own domesticated ones they do brows on different grasses and herbs and they do like to eat fallen / ripe fruits, they also eat herbivore droppings which will contain grass/herb products. Sometimes but only "seasonally" grains may also be eaten if they are in their prey's stomach. 

Vegetables are good belly fillers if just chopped and will do no harm. If you blitz some there will be better chance of nutrients being made use of.

 Raw carrots or broccoli stalks, cauliflower stalks are all fantastic for chewing and cleaning teeth..

My favourite little book to read is "Honeys Natural Feeding Handbook for Dogs". If you register with the Honeys website you can request a FREE book with no further hassle from "Honeys" , or they can be purchased from Amazon at 1p  plus delivery.

Carry on, and enjoy feeding your puppy on a raw diet. :cheers: 

 

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Yes, Green tripe STINKS !!!

A fantastic food.:wub:

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One of my old dogs was quite badly affected by eating just a small amount of onion dropped on the floor. She became depressed and when I mentioned it at work (I used to work in a vet's) one of the nurses looked it up and said that they can become anaemic. As there is a lot of anecdotal evidence, just as excuseme says, of dogs eating it with no ill effect I wonder if it is just some dogs that are sensitive to it. I am sure that, over the years, I have allowed many of my dogs to eat onions with no, noticeable, ill effects. My bitch was in season at the time of eating the onions. Perhaps that was a factor?

When the onion eating incident was reported to one of the vets they admitted her and put her on a drip!

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3 hours ago, excuseme said:

Hello,

What a lucky puppy having a new owner who wants to feed raw !

Your variety sounds quiet ok, you have obviously done some homework before starting.

There is no benefit in giving a puppy of your age any milk, so I would quiet happily stop this.

My lot get onions if we have any left over stew (I always use a lot in our own food) and if some pieces of raw were to drop onto the floor while preparing them I would not worry if one of the girls were to quickly grab it and swallow it!  But I would not intentionally add any to the girls diets on a regular basis.

You are giving quiet a lot of bones, they are a good product and there is plenty of good nutrition in edible bones. If you find that your pup's poo's are getting very white and hard on a regular basis it may be better to give a little less bone and offer more meat. I am sure with the lovely variety you are using everything will be fine.

Some say that fruit and vegetables are not required, but if you watch wild dogs or even our own domesticated ones they do brows on different grasses and herbs and they do like to eat fallen / ripe fruits, they also eat herbivore droppings which will contain grass/herb products. Sometimes but only "seasonally" grains may also be eaten if they are in their prey's stomach. 

Vegetables are good belly fillers if just chopped and will do no harm. If you blitz some there will be better chance of nutrients being made use of.

 Raw carrots or broccoli stalks, cauliflower stalks are all fantastic for chewing and cleaning teeth..

My favourite little book to read is "Honeys Natural Feeding Handbook for Dogs". If you register with the Honeys website you can request a FREE book with no further hassle from "Honeys" , or they can be purchased from Amazon at 1p  plus delivery.

Carry on, and enjoy feeding your puppy on a raw diet. :cheers: 

 

Excuse me

Many thanks for your reply

Her faeces are just normal and very firm, what has surprised me is just how little of it there is !. Many thanks for the info on the Honeys handbook I shall certainly look into it, and yes I did do my homework prior to her arrival, she is certainly thriving and growing like a weed

Regards

Chipper

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2 hours ago, gypsysmum2 said:

One of my old dogs was quite badly affected by eating just a small amount of onion dropped on the floor. She became depressed and when I mentioned it at work (I used to work in a vet's) one of the nurses looked it up and said that they can become anaemic. As there is a lot of anecdotal evidence, just as excuseme says, of dogs eating it with no ill effect I wonder if it is just some dogs that are sensitive to it. I am sure that, over the years, I have allowed many of my dogs to eat onions with no, noticeable, ill effects. My bitch was in season at the time of eating the onions. Perhaps that was a factor?

When the onion eating incident was reported to one of the vets they admitted her and put her on a drip!

gypsymum2

I think you may well be right regarding onions only affecting certain individual dogs, i vividly remember many years ago our border collie who i occasionally gave ( rightly or wrongly) table scraps  which included fried onions ?????

regards

Chipper

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Posted (edited)

Maybe after cooking, onions become a lot safer and the harmful content is destroyed much like over cooking, and processed foods in which good bacteria and enzymes are destroyed or altered by the cooking/heating process. ^_^

Edited by excuseme

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Posted (edited)

Onions & garlic are in the same plant family, but i have used garlic as a nontoxic wormer in debilitated dogs & cats, pups & kittens, for decades, now - underweight, elderly, poorly nourished, heavy internal parasite load, etc. // None were made worse by the garlic; all expelled large numbers of worms, etc, in their feces.

One 9-WO Coonhound pup was the sole survivor of a litter of 9, she weighed 1.5# when the wife of the breeder pressed her into my hands & said, "take her, I'll tell him she died". // She produced NOTHING BUT roundworms like spaghetti for 3 days straight, despite eating normal amounts of real food [meat-based high quality kibble, cottage cheese, yogurt, scrambled eggs, etc, all in frequent small meals, 4 to 5 snacks daily vs a meal in a bowl].
At 12-WO, she weighed 12#; at 14-WO, she weighed 16#, & was a strapping, glossy hunk of hound, bright-eyed & solid muscle. I found her a good home with a hunter who already had 3 Coonhounds - she left at 4-MO, a happy rambunctious young dog, who could bay down the moon, LOL. [Coonhounds aren't shy about speaking up. ;)  ]

That said, i would never give a dog onion - but garlic is often found in dog foods & dog treats, as well as feline edibles. Look at some ingredient panels, & U'll find it.

Integrative Veterinary Journal -
http://ivcjournal.com/garlic/

QUOTE,
"
Almost all the “evidence” against garlic for dogs comes from a 2000 study at Hokkaido University.2  Four dogs were each given 1.25 ml of garlic extract per kg of body weight for seven straight days. For example, if the dog weighed 50 pounds, he would be given approximately 25 large raw garlic cloves.
None of the dogs showed any outward toxicity symptoms, but there was an effect on their red blood cells; even at these highly-elevated doses, none of the dogs developed anemia. ... However, a study published by Chang, et al in 2004
3 clearly showed that allicin is beneficial to mammals’ health, & there was no report of hemolytic anemia in spite of the high concentrations of garlic [given] during the study.
...

"There can be multiple causes for Heinz body hemolytic anemia. Wendy Wallner, DVM, reminds us that other substances such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and benzocaine-containing topical preparations can also cause Heinz body hemolytic anemia in the dog. These preparations probably account for many cases since ingredients in creams are absorbed through the skin, allowing toxins to build up in the bloodstream."


Per another study, onion has on average FIFTEEN TIMES the concentration of thiosulfate, the culprit compound - in garlic, it's present in trace amounts or undetectable.

Edited by leashedForLife

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